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Super-Fast Broadband will Produce Positive Changes in the UK

Published: 26/01/2011 by Comments


Winning a contest sponsored by BT, the town of Innerleithen, Scotland is silently applauding as it will be among one of six rural or outlying communities to obtain exceptionally fast broadband Internet access in the UK.

The high-speed service (40 megabits) is scheduled to be installed in 2012. Andrew Fraser, a resident of the small Scottish community, promoted town support for the plan. The 25-year-old commented that service is “...massively important just to keep up-to-date.” He added that “[E]veryone is online these days.” Therefore, “. . . it would be good for us to keep up and be a part of it.”

In the meantime, Peebles, another rural community close to Innerleithen, is patiently waiting for its opportunity to stream videos and share information at higher speeds. Locals in the town are still unsure when they will be connected to the faster service. One of the residents commented that the town has been waiting a long time to receive broadband access.

However, Peebles’ residents can remain optimistic as the government projects that exceptionally fast Internet connections should be implemented within the next four years. What’s more, the plan calls for coverage that will provide service for around two-thirds of the Internet users in the country. Besides Innerleithen, the town of Wallingford, in the Oxfordshire area of England, is also excited that it will obtain fibre optic broadband service in 2012.

Nigel Hughes, who is a town councilor, in the small community, said that “. . . high-speed Internet is “essential” for rural communities.” He asserted that the service will breathe life back into smaller towns as people will be able to work from home.

Overall, forty-one small UK towns and villages will have super-fast access by around this time next year. BT announced that its latest plan is to provide broadband Internet connections to approximately 300,000 of its customers across Great Britain.


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